Monday, January 29, 2007

Stiff

In my pursuit of knowledge of anything that may assist me with my zombie hunting career, I recently read Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach. Though she doesn't throughly explore the undead menace, she does tackle the subject of reanimation (covering some of the topics discussed in the Not Supernatural post).
While this book has a very respectful tone towards the "afterlife" of human remains, it primarily discusses the positive things that corpses do for humans, such as providing teaching tools (both in medical and detective fields) and a means to experiment where using living human beings would be utterly and ethically wrong. It doesn't discuss the damage that corpses do when they rise up and destroy everything you hold dear. I can only assume that Roach did not interview any zombie experts for her book, or more likely, did not include any apocalyptic scenarios for fear of inducing public panic.
Irregardless of its lack of undead content, Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers, proved to be a thoughtful exploration of human remains, written with a calmness that makes me wonder if Ms. Roach will agree to join my team once the dead rise.
On a side note, Roach discovers that the legal definition of "death" is brain death, so start preparing your zombie-killing legal defense. However, I must add that usually putrification is also grounds for declaring legal death, so be sure to include that in your defense, so that you are not actually accused of killing a zombie, in the event of causing brain death.

2 Comments:

Blogger Slash said...

I don't know about that...

Someone could be in a hospital and brain dead, kept alive only through artificial means, and if you walked in and shot them, it would still be murder/manslaughter. Brain death might be HER definition of dead, but I don't think it's the legal one.

Also, irregardless is not a word. :)

5:24 PM  
Blogger Rens said...

Duly noted.

As for the other matter, sounds like a case for a zombie-specialized lawyer. Maybe that should be a focus in law school?

10:52 PM  

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